In ancient times, it was easy to capture a monkey. The hunter would wander into a forest, find a ripe coconut, and cut out a small hole that was exactly the same size as a monkey’s fist. He would then drink the sweet milk and eat some of the soft flesh.

Having eaten, he would secure the empty coconut to a tree with a thick rope or leather strap. After placing a banana inside the coconut, the hunter would go home.

Sure enough, a monkey would discover that hollow coconut with a banana inside and try to pull it out. But the hole is only just big enough for a monkey to put in an empty fist. When his fist was holding the banana, he couldn’t get it out.

By the time the hunter returns, the monkey has been struggling for hours to get his fist out together with the banana. Seeing the hunter, the monkey tries even harder to get both his fist and the banana out.

All the monkey needs to do to escape is to let go of the banana, Then he can pull his hand out and run. But does the monkey let go?

No way! Because monkeys always think, “It is my banana. I found it It’s mine!”

And that is how monkeys get captured every time.

Its also how humans get captured.

Say your dear son dies and you can’t stop grieving over him. You

think about him all the time. You can’t sleep or work. Why?

All you need to do is to “let go of the banana” and you can move on in your life without suffering so much.

But you can’t let go. Only because you think, “It’s my son. I gave birth to him. He’s mine.”

Mothers tell me that when they look into the eyes of their newborn child for the first time, they intuitively know that this is a being not totally made from the parents; it is a being with its own past and individuality, a visitor from somewhere unknown who has now entered their life. It is theirs to care for, nurture, and love . . . not to possess.

Unfortunately, many parents forget this over the years and start owning their children. So when it is time to let them go, they can’t. If only they had remembered that one person can never own another,

not even one’s own child. Then they would never get captured like a monkey and suffer with grief. To love someone is to one day let them go.Say your dear son dies and you can’t stop grieving over him. You think about him all the time. You can’t sleep or work. Why?

All you need to do is to “let go of the banana” and you can move on in your life without suffering so much.

But you can’t let go. Only because you think, “It’s my son. I gave birth to him. He’s mine.”

Mothers tell me that when they look into the eyes of their newborn child for the first time, they intuitively know that this is a being not totally made from the parents; it is a being with its own past and individuality, a visitor from somewhere unknown who has now entered their life. It is theirs to care for, nurture, and love . . . not to possess.

Unfortunately, many parents forget this over the years and start owning their children. So when it is time to let them go, they can’t. If only they had remembered that one person can never own another,

not even one’s own child. Then they would never get captured like a monkey and suffer with grief.

To love someone is to one day let them go.

By Ajahn Brahm

This is a real story , folks use the coconut with the banana to capture the monkey.


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